Bahrain water consumption soars

Water consumption in Bahrain is almost double the international average, said an environmental expert.

More than 400 liters are being used a day compared to the norm of up to 265 liters, said Public Commission for the Protection of Marine Resources, Environment and Wildlife senior environmental specialist Rehan Ahmed.

Ahmed was speaking on the occasion of World Water Day (WWD), which was highlighted at the Bahrain Polytechnic in Isa Town.

WWD is observed on March 22 and this year's theme is Clean Water for a Healthy World.

The annual growth rate in water use is about eight to 10 per cent, but groundwater levels are falling at a rate of around a meter a year, which has been happening for 30 years, Ahmed said.

'With no major surface water sources, the ground water levels are under great pressure because of rapid population growth, expanding industrial and commercial sectors and deteriorating climatic conditions,' he explained.

The environmentalist said Bahrain's priority should be water conservation or to reduce the use of water.

Ahmed said practicing water conservation would decrease consumer's monthly water bills and reduce environmental pollution.

'Water conservation is a key link between balancing current and future water needs,' he said.

'In Bahrain, we have access to an abundance of water and we're accustomed to having it available at the twist of a faucet. In order to ensure adequate water resources for our future needs, we must urgently put conservation measures into effect now,” he added.

'The water we receive from the tap includes the cost of retrieving, treating, pumping and delivering water. This over consumption also put further financial pressure as the waste water has to be collected, treated and disposed environmentally.'

Ahmed said water conservation could also reduce the amount of water required to be processed by wastewater treatment plants, again preserving infrastructure and also reducing the amount of waste discharged to water bodies.

He said sound water use practices could make consumers more resilient during times of drought, low rainfall, negating the need for mandatory interventions.

Mr Ahmed recommended several ways to conserve water in the home, including adopting water-saving technologies and changing habit patterns.

'Every home should install low-flow shower heads, low-flush toilets and waterless urinals to save large volumes of water,' he said.

'People should also install water waste or recycling systems that allow the reuse of grey water for flushing toilets or for the garden, and recycling of wastewater through purification at a water treatment plant,” Ahmed concluded. - TradeArabia News Service

Water consumption in Bahrain is almost double the international average, said an environmental expert.

More than 400 liters are being used a day compared to the norm of up to 265 liters, said Public Commission for the Protection of Marine Resources, Environment and Wildlife senior environmental specialist Rehan Ahmed.

Ahmed was speaking on the occasion of World Water Day (WWD), which was highlighted at the Bahrain Polytechnic in Isa Town.

WWD is observed on March 22 and this year's theme is Clean Water for a Healthy World.

The annual growth rate in water use is about eight to 10 per cent, but groundwater levels are falling at a rate of around a meter a year, which has been happening for 30 years, Ahmed said.

'With no major surface water sources, the ground water levels are under great pressure because of rapid population growth, expanding industrial and commercial sectors and deteriorating climatic conditions,' he explained.

The environmentalist said Bahrain's priority should be water conservation or to reduce the use of water.

Ahmed said practicing water conservation would decrease consumer's monthly water bills and reduce environmental pollution.

'Water conservation is a key link between balancing current and future water needs,' he said.

'In Bahrain, we have access to an abundance of water and we're accustomed to having it available at the twist of a faucet. In order to ensure adequate water resources for our future needs, we must urgently put conservation measures into effect now,” he added.

'The water we receive from the tap includes the cost of retrieving, treating, pumping and delivering water. This over consumption also put further financial pressure as the waste water has to be collected, treated and disposed environmentally.'

Ahmed said water conservation could also reduce the amount of water required to be processed by wastewater treatment plants, again preserving infrastructure and also reducing the amount of waste discharged to water bodies.

He said sound water use practices could make consumers more resilient during times of drought, low rainfall, negating the need for mandatory interventions.

Mr Ahmed recommended several ways to conserve water in the home, including adopting water-saving technologies and changing habit patterns.

'Every home should install low-flow shower heads, low-flush toilets and waterless urinals to save large volumes of water,' he said.

'People should also install water waste or recycling systems that allow the reuse of grey water for flushing toilets or for the garden, and recycling of wastewater through purification at a water treatment plant,” Ahmed concluded. - TradeArabia News Service